When your puppy reaches adolescence, he may be unable to control his impulses and start to test limits (just like a human child). Adolescent jumping up can turn into “nose boinking” which can lead to broken glasses or even a bloody nose. Jumping up often combines with mouthing behavior where the pup bites and grabs your hands, clothing or even your derriere in a grabbing game of tag.
Also, it's your job to never let anyone else allow your puppy to jump up on them! They will say, "It's OK, she's just a puppy, I don't mind if she jumps on me". You must rush in and pull the puppy down immediately, put your pup in a sit, praise the puppy then scold the person ! Continue to hold the puppy in a sit and let the person greet the pup. Explain to them they can never allow the puppy to jump on them - the puppy must sit to be greeted. To stop the jumping up behavior in pups, I do as much people training as puppy training!
Teach your puppy a conflicting behavior such as “fetch your ball.” She can’t jump up if she’s running to bring you her ball or favorite toy. Just the name of a ​special game or toy—“go get your bear!”—can change the dog’s focus and redirect the behavior long enough for you to evade the jumping. With enough repetition, your puppy will begin to associate your home-coming with “go fetch” instead of jumping up.
If a dog is stressed or afraid, their demeanor and typical behaviors will change. If you see this in your dog (or really any dog you know) you should step back and check on your dog. Are they hurt? Did a new dog come around they don’t know? Has the weather changed? Is it hot outside? When was the last time they had a chance to go outside to pee or poop? 
2. Greet your dog on his level! In addition to waiting to greet your dog, you should also greet him in a stooped position, so that he doesn't have to jump up to greet you. Additionally, if you wish to pet or cuddle your dog, do so on his level. This removes the need to jump at any time. PRAISE HIM for not jumping. If he jumps, use the "Off" command until he stops.
Determining if this is your dog is a little more complicated, but it is often seen when your dog isn’t very excited (or that there isn’t much of a reason to be excited). This is more than likely to happen when you are in their way or have something that they want. They will usually jump on you and try to push you back more than just jumping up to give you kisses. Often times they will jump on you and try to hold on when you push them away or try to move into them. Sometimes moving into them may elicit a growl because they want to back you off. 

Puppies should be told from day one, "no jumping." Anything you do not wish your cute little puppy to do when it is full-grown should not be allowed when it is a puppy. Think about the behaviors you allow your puppy to do; is it something you will always allow him to do even when he is full-grown? If the answer is no, do not allow your puppy to do it from day one.
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