Also, it's your job to never let anyone else allow your puppy to jump up on them! They will say, "It's OK, she's just a puppy, I don't mind if she jumps on me". You must rush in and pull the puppy down immediately, put your pup in a sit, praise the puppy then scold the person ! Continue to hold the puppy in a sit and let the person greet the pup. Explain to them they can never allow the puppy to jump on them - the puppy must sit to be greeted. To stop the jumping up behavior in pups, I do as much people training as puppy training!
You shouldn’t stop this type of jumping. You need to diagnose your dog's issue and remedy that. If your dog is just stressed being in a new situation, you should calmly get them off of you, offer them a treat to calm them down, and have them sit politely beside you until their stress level has subsided (or take them somewhere else so that they can calm down if it is taking a while for them to calm down.) But most of all, please do not just ignore this behavior change. 

An L-footer is a great way to stop your dog from jumping over the fence if used a little differently. You’ll want to turn it upside down and use it at the top of the fence. Create the L-shape and securely fasten the short side to the top of the fence and have the rest of the hardware angled towards the yard so that when your pooch looks up they will see fencing.

1. Do not let your dog make a big deal out of your arrival home. In fact, as the alpha leader of your family's "pack", you shouldn't even greet him or her for at least 15 minutes. If your dog jumps around and pesters you before that, squirt him with water pistol or shake a can filled with pebbles. This will startle him, and if done on a regular basis, calm him whenever you get home. He won't make such a big deal of your arrival, and thus learn that he can greet you without jumping. Follow the same technique for any visitors to your home. Do not introduce the dog to your visitors until after 15 minutes or longer.
Dog Obedience Advice is a free resource offering advice on dog training and a host of common problems dog owners face, including: aggression in all its forms, from territoriality to possessiveness, and from dominance aggression to aggression caused by fear; the most common and frustrating obedience issues, such as problem digging, chewing, and barking; and comprehensive information on house training methods with sound advice on tackling all of the most common housebreaking problems.
Unless given a command to jump, a dog should never be allowed to jump on humans. A dog that jumps on humans of its own free will is a dog that does not respect the person it is jumping on. Even those cute little toy dogs should not be allowed to jump on people. While you may think it is cute, it is not cute to everyone else. Not only is it annoying to most people to have someone else's dog jump on them, it can also be dangerous. A jumping dog can knock people over, muddy their clothes, put runners in nylons and scratch the skin.
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