Understand the dog's behavior. In a dog's world, it is instinctual to greet another dog by coming nose-to-nose with them. This allows them to sniff each other's faces and become acquainted with the other dog's scent. Of course, your nose is a bit higher to reach so it is only natural that your dog will jump up to get closer to your face when greeting you.[1] This can be quite annoying and unnecessary, but fortunately, the habit can be broken.

Paying attention to a dog only when all four paws are on the floor can work well, if jumping isn’t well entrenched and if everybody who deals with the dog follows the rules. Unfortunately, much of humanity will get busy undermining you. “I don’t mind your puppy jumping up,” they say, while you tear your hair out. Or they get all disciplinarian, maybe kneeing the dog in the chest. That is not only mean but counterproductive, because dogs often respond by trying to appease. Since humans are usually taller than dogs, reaching our muzzles to lick them involves jumping up.
Unless given a command to jump, a dog should never be allowed to jump on humans. A dog that jumps on humans of its own free will is a dog that does not respect the person it is jumping on. Even those cute little toy dogs should not be allowed to jump on people. While you may think it is cute, it is not cute to everyone else. Not only is it annoying to most people to have someone else's dog jump on them, it can also be dangerous. A jumping dog can knock people over, muddy their clothes, put runners in nylons and scratch the skin.
Jumping up seems cute when your puppy is a little guy, but when he grows into an adolescent, jumping on people can become more than rude. These juvenile delinquent dogs haven’t learned how to control their excitement and can bruise, scratch or knockdown owners when they launch themselves and plow into you with their paws and claws. With small dogs and young pups, these tips to stop jumping up can work.
Start by teaching your puppy the word NO. Use that word only when she is doing something you do not like. You have to use the word NO in a loud, stern voice that is different from all other ways you communicate with her, so that she knows there is something wrong. You also have to catch her in the act that you don't like, so that it will associate the word NO with the action that she is doing. Be consistent, and follow your verbal command with a light smack or moving her to a time out spot.
I remember going to a dog park where a little 4-month-old Boxer puppy ran around jumping on everyone. The dog was not heavy enough to knock most of the adults down. However, it left everyone with muddy pants and the dog was big enough to knock over small children. The owner did nothing to stop the jumping puppy. After all, it was just a small pup. Everyone around her was pretty annoyed at the muddy prints the dog was leaving all over their clothes. That is an owner who will have a problem with her dog jumping on people when it gets older.
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